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How to Insulate Your Garden Shed or Office?

The Benefits of Insulating Your Garden Shed

Ensuring your shed is completely insulated can make a huge difference to how warm it feels when you’re in there, not to mention the savings that an insulated building will bring.

This guide aims to provide you with all of the steps required for insulating your wooden garden shed or summer house and turn it into a super comfortable space which doesn’t cost a fortune to heat! So if this sounds like something you want, read on…

how to insulate your garden shed

Insulation helps maintain ambient temperatures inside the building throughout extremes of heat and cold. It reduces draughts and minimises condensation while providing protection from noise pollution. If installed correctly, insulation also improves air quality by preventing mould growth – so crucial when using portable gas heaters.

There are many different types of insulation to choose from, most commonly used in residential construction is Fibreglass and Rockwool, both made from sand or stone which has been crushed into a fine powder and mixed with varying amounts of recycled glass depending on the manufacture process.

The resulting material is then spun together using an electrostatic charge that causes it to form fibres resembling wool (hence the name).

These fibres can be bound tighter than other materials such as cotton making them more efficient at stopping heat loss through air infiltration where gaps occur between studs framing members walls ceilings etcetera – reducing energy costs substantially over time; however their effectiveness decreases when exposed directly to moisture so they must always be protected by vapour barriers such as vapour permeable membranes.

You will need:

1. Insulation board or rolls of mineral wool, which can be found at most DIY stores.

2. A pen knife or Stanley knife for cutting the insulation to size.

3. A tape measure and pencil for marking out where you’re going to cut.



Preparation is key – make sure your garden shed has been fully cleaned out before starting any work on insulating it!

Any dirt left inside could cause problems with moisture levels and also make fitting more difficult so take care when vacuuming up dust etcetera from around corners/skirting boards etcetera firstly using an extension lead if necessary followed by sweeping any cobwebs away afterwards using a broomstick handle or similar object such as an old mop head; this will ensure that only clean air enters once you begin installing insulation materials inside.

STEP ONE:

The first step is to measure how much space there is between your shed’s floorboards so that you can select the right type of material for insulating it properly – if necessary use some scrap wood cut down at home (or ask friends/family members who live nearby).

For example: If your garden building has tongue-and-groove timber walls then ideally choose something like Roxul Comfort Batt which comes in rolls instead because these are easier than dealing with individual sheets when trying not only fit them but align them too! You’ll also need plenty of room on either side (about six inches) so that any gaps can be filled in afterwards with additional pieces of material such as mineral wool – this will help stop draughts coming through whilst also adding extra insulation value.

STEP TWO:

The next step is to cut your insulation boards or rolls down to size using a Stanley knife or penknife, making sure you have enough for the entire surface area you want to cover.

It’s best to start by taping some offcuts together temporarily so they resemble the shape of your building before cutting them out – this makes it easier and quicker when fitting later on. If there are any protruding nails or screws etcetera then use a hammer/pliers etcetera remove them firstly before starting work with insulation because these may cause problems during installation otherwise.


STEP THREE:

Once all edges have been cut, lay them out on top of each other and attach together using tape so they don’t move around when being laid down; make sure there is plenty left over at both ends (about two inches) to allow for any gaps that might occur later between boards or rolls – it’s much easier fitting this way than trying squeeze everything into place whilst lining up joints perfectly straight!

Make sure you measure carefully beforehand though as some materials can expand quite dramatically once installed due to heat changes in temperature which means extra material needs accommodating accordingly too. It helps if someone stands underneath where things are happening above to help guide and manoeuvre everything into place as safely as possible.

STEP FOUR:

The next step involves laying down an appropriate layer of mineral wool which acts like a buffer between any gaps that might occur later between boards or rolls – it’s much easier fitting this way than trying squeeze everything into place whilst lining up joints perfectly straight!

Make sure you measure carefully beforehand though because some materials can expand quite dramatically once installed due to heat changes in temperature which means extra material needs accommodating accordingly too.

It helps if someone stands underneath where things are happening above to help guide and manoeuvre everything into place as safely as possible.